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Simone Development Pushing For Biotech Boom In Bronx

Simone Healthcare Development president Guy Leibler pitched the bio-tech business on the benefits of Bronx.

 

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Ancient Salt Marsh In Bronx Reveals Dangerous Flooding Likely For NYC

For the past four years scientists have been working in the Bronx, taking advantage of a unique opportunity to study and research the past and future of our coastal ecosystem....
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Earth's Next Epoch

I was raised in the Baptist church. As a grade school child, I memorized the books of the Bible. Maybe because of that personal history, when I started to study geology I didn't resist memorizing the many pieces of the geologic time scale....
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Let The Sun Shine In

My scientific training tells me that the days are getting a little bit longer now. And I do believe that. But my spirits say it remains dark awfully long into the morning and the sun surely sets early in the afternoon....
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All That Glitters Is Not (Pure) Gold

Recently I had the pleasure of going to the wedding celebration of my assistant at work - whom I count as a good friend - and her new husband....
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Keeping Warm With Gold Fever

I own a couple of small gold nuggets. They came from the Round Mountain gold mine in Nevada, which I visited a few years ago. A tour of the open-pit mine was crowned by a visit to their foundry where the molten metal was poured into gold bars....
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Seas On Titan & Your Heating Bill

Like most regions of the country, the area where I live suffered through colder than average temperatures in mid-November. If you pay for your heating bill month by month, you are now facing the sticker shock that results from those bitter times. Happy holidays....
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Harvesting Energy From Sunlight

What if there were a two-for-one sale on kilowatts? Your power bill would be cut in half -- not a bad result for your monthly budget....
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Wake Up And Smell The Genes

Like millions of Americans, my day starts by plugging in the coffeepot. In my case, it is an old fashion percolator. It clears its throat and brews my coffee while I rub sleep out of my eyes and brush my teeth....
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How Much Does It Hurt?

When I take my elderly mother to the emergency room, the nurse asks how much pain she is in, on a scale of 1 to 10. There is a chart with pictures of little smiley faces, neutral faces, and grimacing faces to help a person - perhaps a child - determine a number. Pain management is an important part of human medicine....
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Bones Can Tell Quite A Story

His teeth had no cavities, but they were heavily worn. He was about my height -- some 5 feet, 7 inches tall. He wasn't petite, likely weighing around 160 pounds. Well before his death, he broke six of his ribs. Five of them never healed, but he kept going nevertheless....
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Breeding Better Wheat

Earlier this year I went to a fundraiser where I bought a bag of Glee flour. Glee is a variety of hard red spring wheat that was developed at Washington State University. I used the flour in my favorite bread recipe, one I have modified a bit from a Mennonite cookbook I treasure....
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Triggering The Ice Age

From time to time I give public talks on climate change - those large scale changes geologists have been studying since the 1830s. At those talks I'm often asked a basic question about climate that, until now, has stumped scientists. Here's the background....
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Correcting Errors In The Language Of Life

My word processor is set up to deal with the errors I make when writing. The programmers who wrote the computer program knew I would screw things up, so they built in corrective functions like spellcheck and the ability to simply backspace to delete typos. Those of us old enough to remember manual typewriters still sometimes marvel at the ease with which corrections in documents can now be made. ...
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Plants Respond To Sounds Of Insects Eating Leaves

At least to me, plants have never seemed like the brightest bulb in the box. They stand around, looking green, hoping for a sunny day but not able to walk, talk or turn on the TV. However, due to a recent university press release, I have got to rethink my attitudes about vegetation....
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Forensic Science Meets Nuclear Chemistry

As a kid, I read the Sherlock Holmes stories and the mysteries of Agatha Christie. As an adult, I wrote four mysteries that focused on a Quaker heroine solving crimes she happened across in her religious community — I published them using my grandmother's name — Irene Allen — as a pseudonym. And, as a geologist, I have read about real-life criminal investigations that involved samples of sand and soil....
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Smarter Than Your Average Bear

Alex Waroff had a fantastic summer job this year. The veterinary student at Washington State University worked with faculty members as they tested just how clever grizzly bears are. What's at issue is the use of tools....
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How Hard Is That?

A good friend of mine checks each morning on the web for the final "Jeopardy" question. It's the last question on the taped "Jeopardy" program to be broadcast later that day. I do not go to movies or follow sports, so I'm often at a loss when it comes to many quiz show questions. But recently I was in a position to answer the "Jeopardy" question because of my early training in geology....
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A Wolf In Other Clothing

I was hospitalized for ten days in late July. In August, to rebuild my strength, I took my dog on increasingly long walks around town. We went virtually every day; the exercise was good for both Buster Brown and me....
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Behind The Hum Of Electrical Power

Think about the most complicated machine you have dealt with in the past year. Was it a beeping monitor tethered to a high-tech device in an emergency room? Or was it a superfast computer you used at work?...
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A Light Fast Twice Per Week

It certainly sounded like a fad to me. A while ago I caught a program on public television about a medical doctor in Great Britain. Dr. Michael Mosley, like millions in both that country and in the U.S., found that in middle age he needed to lose weight and lower his blood sugar and cholesterol levels....
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Have A Cup Of Joe To Help Your Eyes?

My day starts with coffee. I am too cheap to buy it by the cup from baristas, so I just brew my own Folgers by the pot. I have a cup or two as I settle into work each morning, and another cup - sometimes two - in the early afternoon. That may not be wise for a chronic insomniac like myself, but it's a lifelong habit that at this point would be quite tough to break....
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What Antibiotics May Be Doing To Us

It is astonishing to think about, but when my grandfather was born, tuberculosis was the number one cause of death in our country. Worse still, one in five children did not live to see their fifth birthday, in large part due to endemic and epidemic diseases. Today that has all changed....
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An Ancient American Woman Buried By The Sea

I need to get a cap on my front tooth redone - it has a significant chip in it. Luckily I live at a time in which dentists are in every city and town, plying their trade in ways that can help us each day....
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Designing New Food Products

Today’s snack food aisle in the grocery store contains a lot more products than when I was a kid. Back then, we mainly had potato chips and saltines, but not much more. Now there is a multitude of choices designed to help you satisfy your cravings for something crunchy....
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Seize The Day: Visit A Park

This is the time of year to get outdoors and observe Mother Nature in all her glory....
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Resurrection Ecology Revives Ancient Organism

The Michael Crichton book “Jurassic Park” and the movie based on the best-seller presented what might happen if scientists were able to clone extinct dinosaurs, bringing them back to life....
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A Tale Of Two Stoves

My elderly aunt in Canada recently came into some money. She decided - very generously - to send part of it to each of her nieces and nephews....
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High Technology Meets Fields Of Wheat

As my friends and relatives know, I am quite a dinosaur in several respects. I get a lot of my news the old fashioned way from hard copy newspapers. I still pay my bills with paper checks sent through the mail. And nothing pleases me more when I get home at night than to find I have a “snail mail” letter from an old friend who took the time to put down ideas on paper with a pen....
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From Shopping Bags To Diesel Fuel

My household accumulates quite a number of plastic shopping bags. Most come home with me from the grocery store. I use them to line the little garbage pail that sits under the kitchen sink and the wastebasket that’s in the bathroom....
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Grizzly Bear Research May Help Human Medicine

I have gained 5 pounds since last summer. My body mass index (BMI) is still fine, but I need to stop gaining to keep it that way....
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Bridging The Valley Of Death

As a child, I learned about the “valley of the shadow of death” from the twenty-third Psalm. A similar image is conjured up by economists who talk about the “valley of death.”...
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Giving Warning Of Volcanic Eruptions

I was living in eastern Washington State in May of 1980 when Mount St. Helens erupted after a massive landslide triggered by a magnitude 5.1 quake. ...
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The Total Costs Of Crude Oil

Even if I walked to work each day, I would still be indebted for my daily bread to cars and trucks....
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Air Pollution Knows No Borders

We have all seen globes in classrooms. They represent the Earth well - better than flat maps can do....
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Termites And Better Biofuels

Every time I fill my gas tank, I see the notice on the pump that explains part of the fuel I’m buying is ethanol. Ethanol is alcohol, a type of biofuel rather than fossil fuel. While biofuels can be good to promote national energy independence and possibly help with greenhouse gas emissions, the ethanol in our gasoline is made from corn....
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A Step Forward In Predicting Volcanic Eruptions

There are two main things most people would like to know about particular volcanoes: when is the next eruption and how big will that eruption be? Scientists in Iceland have taken another step forward in monitoring volcanoes to best predict when they will erupt and even warn people of the size of the coming eruption....
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Designing Better Asphalt

Dr. Haifang Wen grew up in a rural area of Shandong province, in eastern China. In his youth there were not many paved highways in the Chinese countryside....
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A Brisk Walking Pace Is Better

One of the things my mutt from the pound and I like to do together is go on long walks. Sometimes on weekends Buster Brown and I stroll at the bottom of the Snake River Canyon where dogs can be off-leash (as Mother Nature intended)....
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Chemical Stem Cell Signature

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center have found a chemical "signature" in blood-forming stem cells that predicts whether patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will respond to chemotherapy....
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The Door To Hell Lies In Turkmenistan

I have written here before about the problem of unwanted fires burning in coal deposits. Above and below ground, coal fires are a problem in both developed and developing nations. If we are serious about reducing our carbon dioxide emissions, we should address the unwanted fires burning around the world....
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How To Better Interpret What You Hear From Scientists

We live in an age shaped by scientific research. Medical practice, for example, changes a bit each year because of new discoveries in the laboratory or in drug trials. We have come to expect progress in a variety of technical fields, and science often lives up to our hopes for it....
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NASA Launches Bronx High School Project Into Space

All their hard work definitely paid off — three lucky students from the Bronx High School of Science won NASA’s competition to send their experiment into outer space....
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A New Medication May Help People Stay Sober

Alcoholism runs in part of my family. I lost a grandfather to it, and a couple of others in the family have been affected by it to greater or lesser degrees. Perhaps something like that is true for you, or maybe you have a friend or coworker who wrestles with the malady. ...
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Tree Rings Speak To Ancient Climate Change

On a lark, when I was a college student I took a class in field biology. It sounded romantic and I was young, so even though it didn’t really make any sense for a geology student to take the senior level class in another discipline, I was there bright and early on the first day of the semester....
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From Washington State To Washington, DC

I know we are still only in Advent. But at this point in December, my mind starts to turn toward Christmas. It just cannot be helped, especially in light of all the ads featuring Santa....
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Mercury Contamination From The Good Old Days

When I was a younger and more sprightly woman, I spent part of my life investigating unusual hot springs in rural California. They were salty and quite stinky springs out in the middle of nowhere, and several of them occurred right in the center of an old gold-laced mercury deposit....
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The Battle Of The Bulge

We all know the basic medical facts: we should make healthy choices about what we eat and incorporate exercise into our busy lives....
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Shake, Rattle And Roll

“It’s 8:16 on a chilly, wet morning…You’ve just arrived at work and are pouring a cup of coffee when you become aware of a low ...
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The World Of Pointing

I do not know the full heritage of my mutt from the pound, Buster Brown by name. Buster was listed as a “Lab mix” by the Humane Society but my vet has said he is more of a German Shepherd mix. We all can agree he is a mongrel – indeed, one or both of his parents may have been mutts themselves....
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Undulant Fever In Cattle & People

Normally, when a bacterium invades your body, it is surrounded and engulfed by a white blood cell. At least that is what we were taught in high school biology. If all goes well, the white blood cell kills the bacterium and the infection is over: case closed....
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One Big Eruption

When I was a child, I read a lot of murder mysteries. At a young age I favored the books featuring Miss Marple by Agatha Christie....
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Space Exploration In One Lifetime

In 1957, several years before I was born, the Soviet Union launched Sputnik – the first man-made object to leave the Earth’s atmosphere. That simple little satellite captured people’s imagination around the world....
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Refrain From Rinsing Raw Poultry

Cooking is part necessity, but it’s also partly cultural. The way we cook says a lot about the societies we live in and the traditions that influence our families....
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An Explosion In The History Of Life

My brother likes to build buildings in his free time. He has a couple of timber-frame structures on his property that he put up over the years, and now he’s working on a more traditional “stick” building made of 2x6’s and 2x4’s....
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The Longevity Of Dogs

It is just a fact: most of us outlive our dogs. Indeed, for people who are dog owners throughout their lives, a lot of grieving is guaranteed. Fido #1 dies, is replaced by Fido #2 who also dies, and so on down the long line of dogs in our households....
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The Sun Is Switching Poles

As an aging citizen of Scandinavian descent, I dread this time of year. Each evening the Sun sets significantly earlier. Deep in the bones of us northern people is the notion that summertime is the season of life and hope while winter is, well, cold and horribly dark....
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Infections Spread By Tick Bites

When my dog and I walk along the Snake River during the warm seasons of the year, we can both come home with a tick or two. I am used to feeling those little legs on my skin or scalp and picking off the critters. ...
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Hamburger Grown In A Laboratory

It sounds like science fiction when you first hear about it, but some people see it as a way of addressing both animal welfare issues and environmental concerns....
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Ignorance & The Progress Of Science

“Knowledge is a big subject. Ignorance is bigger. And it is more interesting."...
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Progress In Fighting Wheat Rust

Scientists have been hard at work in recent years combatting a significant disease of wheat. Stem rust is caused by a group of nasty fungal organisms that can infect wheat plants and devastate yields. In some cases up to 100% of the crop can be lost....
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A Predator After All

What are the odds? That was my thought when I read recent pieces about a very special fossil from the Hell Creek Formation of South Dakota....
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New Technology For Solar Panels

I recently pulled some weeds in my yard. Sometimes I’m glad to have a little simple work where I can see progress, even if the effects of my labor are only temporary....
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Medieval Monks Recorded Ireland’s Climate

Ireland enjoys a mild and stable climate. But even in Ireland there are years that stand out as unusual. Recently a team of researchers led by Harvard’s Francis Ludlow announced results of a study of Ireland’s climate based on the Irish Annals, a body of writings containing more than 40,000 entries....
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A Dino Growing At Record Speeds

We live in a time in which most animals are relatively small. If you think back to your exposure to the Ice Age, perhaps in elementary school, you may remember big mammals like the mastodon and the saber tooth tiger....
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Stalagmites Speak Of Climate History

Caves fascinate people. I visited Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico as a kid when my family was on a summer vacation. Maybe that early exposure to the wonders of what geologic processes can do helped influence my decision to study natural science in college....
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From Wolves To Foxes To Man’s Best Friend

When I get home from work I like to blow off a little bit of steam by playing with my dog, Buster Brown....
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The New Guy Tours The Hanford Site

I'm never quite sure how to respond when the focus of the national media shines briefly on the region where I live - usually described as a "remote" part of the Pacific Northwest....
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New Ice Cores Shed More Light On Past Climate Change

Late in the last century scientists published reams of data about Earth’s climate derived from ice cores taken from Greenland and Antarctic glaciers. By drilling down into the ice with hollow bits (think of using a spinning pipe as a drill) workers were able to pull columns of ice up to the surface. The material brought to light in this way was very special for several reasons....
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Talking With Fido May Just Be Possible

Buster Brown, my big mutt from the dog pound, is now 10 years old. Perhaps because he is a senior citizen it took him a full week to learn how to operate the dog door I had installed last winter....
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A Threat To Our Citrus

Did you have a glass of orange juice this morning? If so, you may want to know that the simple pleasures brought to us by citrus fruit are under attack from a disease called citrus greening or yellow dragon disease. It’s caused by bacteria that are not harmful to people, but cripple citrus trees by choking off their internal circulation system. The malady puts our $3 billion per year citrus industry firmly in the crosshairs....
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A New Source Of Natural Gas

The name “natural gas” might be a puzzle. After all, how could there be such a thing as unnatural gas?...
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The Softer Side Of Veterinary Science

Modern veterinary science is a technically advanced field. Some animals receive not just x-rays, but sophisticated scans like MRIs. If you visit a large veterinary hospital you will find cats getting chemotherapy and dogs on the receiving end of complicated surgeries....
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When the Earth Moves Under Our Feet

One of the most breath-taking geologic events is a major earthquake. In just a few moments, shaking of the Earth can result in billions of dollars of damage and thousands of lives lost....
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Hurricane On Saturn

Think hurricanes here on Earth are bad? Check out this amazing snap of a monster hurricane at Saturn's North Pole....
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The Smoking Gun

As any child can tell you, the Mesozoic Era ends with the extinction of the dinosaurs. Most geologists think the cause of that extinction was the impact of an enormous meteorite that hit the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico....
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Bringing A New Apple To Stores Everywhere

When I was young my family ate a lot of Red Delicious apples. Some came out of my trusty lunchbox at school, some were straight from the refrigerator at home. The apples were big and eye-catching, but in my opinion they left something to be desired in their eating qualities. Still, they gave us a reasonably economical and convenient fruit choice, and we were glad to have them....
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Sinkholes Claim Florida Man & Threaten Another House

Sometimes “solid rock” turns out to be anything but sturdy stuff....
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Seeing The World In A Grain Of Sand

Born in 1632 in the Netherlands, Antony van Leeuwenhoek was a self-taught man who made microscopes – ultimately producing some 500 of them....
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Of Bird Songs & Human Speech

There are two features of this time of year that make my heart glad. One is the rapidly increasing length of the day. In September we lose daylight quickly, but in the spring we gain it all back just as rapidly....
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Soils Versus Sea Beds

There is a new debate in paleontology, one that took me by surprise but that shows nicely how some science works. There is a particular type of ancient fossil called the “Ediacara fauna” found in rocks about 550 million years old....
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Rocks From The Moon And Mars

I think the most memorable single day of all my years as a student was the afternoon I got to examine Moon rocks in graduate school....
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The Hardest Wheat Turned Soft By Science

Eighty years ago my mother was in grade school where schoolroom paste was made by mixing a little flour and water together. Memories of that simple glue came back to her when she and I recently stood in my kitchen, mixing two small batches of flour and water....
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A Vital Need

A few weeks ago I lost the use of my toilet and learned first hand just how much I missed it when it wasn’t there....
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Our Daily Bread In 2050

These are the good times....
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Sometimes Mother Nature Doubles Down On Death

Not too long ago I rewrote my will, bringing it up to date. There’s nothing like tackling a project like that to remind me of my mortality. But imagine not just your own individual death, but the finality of the death of all members of your species – that’s the idea behind what geologists and paleontologists investigate when they muse on extinctions and what can cause them....
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Getting More Out Of Each Gallon Of Gasoline

It’s commonplace to observe that we live in very partisan times. Red versus blue factions dominate our public discussions, and there often seems very little room made for agreement in the middle....
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A Salty Tomb Within An Underground Crystal

The next time you have a saltshaker handy, you might want to remove a few grains. If you have a simple magnifying glass, you’ll see the salt is really tiny cubes. Salt is a mineral and each grain is a well-formed crystal that breaks into cubic shapes....
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A Salty Tomb Within An Underground Crystal

The next time you have a saltshaker handy, you might want to remove a few grains. If you have a simple magnifying glass, you’ll see the salt is really tiny cubes. Salt is a mineral and each grain is a well-formed crystal that breaks into cubic shapes....
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Keeping Potatoes Happy & Healthy

The next time you eat a baked spud you might want to think of the agricultural scientists who are hard at work trying to help the humble potato deal successfully with some significant diseases....
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Ancient Plants Make A Comeback

The Ice Age is my favorite bit of Earth history, a time when mammoths, giant beavers and saber tooth tigers roamed the world....
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Looking Good In Black

I have never met Ryan Carney of Brown University, but he is my kind of man. On his arm he has tattooed the image of a feather of the dino-bird known as Archaeopteryx....
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Cookie Cutter Science

One of the best parts of baking for me as a kid was the process of “helping” my mama roll out and cut cookie shapes for the oven. At this age I know that I actually hindered her work and she was just being kind in letting me participate, but at the time I thought I was an aide in the process of transforming a lump of material into a thin sheet of ginger-rich dough that we could cut up into the barnyard animals of which I was so fond – and for which we had many different cutter shapes....
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Rats Are Decent Little Souls

The more we learn about animals, the more complex and interesting is the behavior they exhibit. My faithful mutt-from-the-pound, a dog named Buster Brown, impresses me from time to time with complex behaviors aimed at getting what he wants out of me. Most people who live with animals can tell you a tale or two of diabolical ­– or thoughtful – animal behavior they’ve witnessed....
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Many Pre-Irene UFO Sightings In Bronx

Hours before Hurricane Irene made landfall in New York City, a multitude of triangular shaped lights were witnessed by dozens in the sky above Bronx....
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Latin American Blueberries Called "Superfruit"

While nutritionists have long touted the health benefits of eating antioxidant-rich blueberries, new research at Lehman College in Bronx indicates a form of the fruit grown in Central and South America has earned the title “superfruit.”...
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Yuri Gagarin, First Man In Space

YouTube is celebrating 50 years of human spaceflight with the premiere of an hour-and-a-half long video, First Orbit, that recreates, in real-time, Russian astronaut Yuri Gagarin's first 108-minute long orbit of Earth in 1961....
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IBM's Girl's Go TechKnow

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, jobs requiring science, engineering and technical training has increased 51 percent through 2008. In order to prepare the youth of our society for these careers, more than 200,000 new teachers in math and science will be needed in the next decade, according to estimates by groups such as the Business-Higher Education Forum in Washington. ...
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Hans Christian Ørsted Gets Google Doodled

Thanks to Google, hundreds of millions of people are today celebrating Hans Christian Ørsted's birthday without having much of a clue who he is … so who exactly was he? ...
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Einstein Dean Appointed By Governor Paterson

Allen M. Spiegel, M.D., The Marilyn and Stanley M. Katz Dean of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, has been appointed by Governor David Paterson to the Empire State Stem Cell Board Funding Committee....
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Advancing Against Breast Cancer

Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in the Bronx have discovered how a gene crucial in triggering the spread of breast cancer is turned on and off....
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What's New
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Simone Development Pushing For Biotech Boom In Bronx

Simone Healthcare Development president Guy Leibler pitched the bio-tech business on the benefits of Bronx.
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Ancient Salt Marsh In Bronx Reveals Dangerous Flooding Likely For NYC

For the past four years scientists have been working in the Bronx, taking advantage of a unique opportunity to study and research the past and future of our coastal ecosystem.
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Earth's Next Epoch

I was raised in the Baptist church. As a grade school child, I memorized the books of the Bible. Maybe because of that personal history, when I started to study geology I didn't resist memorizing the many pieces of the geologic time scale.
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Let The Sun Shine In

My scientific training tells me that the days are getting a little bit longer now. And I do believe that. But my spirits say it remains dark awfully long into the morning and the sun surely sets early in the afternoon.
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All That Glitters Is Not (Pure) Gold

Recently I had the pleasure of going to the wedding celebration of my assistant at work - whom I count as a good friend - and her new husband.
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Keeping Warm With Gold Fever

I own a couple of small gold nuggets. They came from the Round Mountain gold mine in Nevada, which I visited a few years ago. A tour of the open-pit mine was crowned by a visit to their foundry where the molten metal was poured into gold bars.
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Seas On Titan & Your Heating Bill

Like most regions of the country, the area where I live suffered through colder than average temperatures in mid-November. If you pay for your heating bill month by month, you are now facing the sticker shock that results from those bitter times. Happy holidays.
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Harvesting Energy From Sunlight

What if there were a two-for-one sale on kilowatts? Your power bill would be cut in half -- not a bad result for your monthly budget.
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Wake Up And Smell The Genes

Like millions of Americans, my day starts by plugging in the coffeepot. In my case, it is an old fashion percolator. It clears its throat and brews my coffee while I rub sleep out of my eyes and brush my teeth.
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How Much Does It Hurt?

When I take my elderly mother to the emergency room, the nurse asks how much pain she is in, on a scale of 1 to 10. There is a chart with pictures of little smiley faces, neutral faces, and grimacing faces to help a person - perhaps a child - determine a number. Pain management is an important part of human medicine.

Featured Author
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Raymond J. Keating

Raymond J. Keating is the editor and publisher of the Keating Reports, which operates the Long Island Sentinel. He is a writer, commentator and economist, who wrote a column for Newsday for more than a decade, and is now a columnist with Long Island Business News and Dolan Media Company. The views expressed by Keating are strictly his own.